The Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicants Act (the “Act”), a new Illinois statute, will become effective January 1, 2015. The Act restricts employers and employment agencies from inquiring about or requiring the disclosure of an employment applicant’s criminal record or criminal history at the application stage, i.e., until the employer or employment agency has determined the applicant is qualified for the position and notified the applicant that he or she has been selected for an interview or, if there is not an interview, until after a conditional offer of employment is made to the applicant.

The Act defines an employer as any person or private entity that has 15 or more employees in the current or preceding year and employment agencies as any person or entity regularly undertaking, with or without compensation, to procure employees for an employer or to procure for employees opportunities to work for an employer.

The prohibition on inquiring into an applicant’s criminal record or criminal history at the application stage does not apply for positions where: (i) employers are required to exclude applicants with certain criminal convictions from employment due to federal or state law; (ii) a standard fidelity bond or an equivalent bond is required and an applicant’s conviction of one or more specified criminal offenses would disqualify the applicant from obtaining a bond; or (iii) employers employ individuals licensed under the Emergency Medical Services Systems Act.

Employers and employment agencies are allowed to notify applicants in writing of the specific offenses that will disqualify an applicant from employment in a particular position due to federal or state law, or the employer’s policy. Therefore, if an employer has a company policy which would disqualify an applicant from being hired based on specific offenses, the employer may notify applicants in writing of that fact.

Civil penalties that apply to employers or employment agencies that violate the Act range from a warning for the first violation to a civil penalty of up to $1,500 for every 30 days that passes without the employer’s or employment agency’s compliance with the Act.

In addition to the new rules under the Act, the ban against employers and employment agencies inquiring into or using an arrest record or expunged criminal history as a basis to refuse to hire remains in effect.

To review your business’ employment application and procedures or to review your business’ policies regarding specific offenses which may disqualify an applicant, or develop a notice letter to potential employees, please contact:

Morris R. Saunders at:

(312) 368-0100 / msaunders@lgattorneys.com

or

Mitchell S. Chaban at:

(312) 368-0100 / mchaban@lgattorneys.com