Tag: policy

Is Your Business BIPA Compliant?

In order to increase productivity and efficiency, businesses are increasingly using biometric data to identify employees, customers and other individuals.  For example, some employers use biometric data to identify their employees and track work hours for purposes of compensation.   Biometric information includes fingerprints, retina scans, facial scans, hand scans, or other identifiers that are biologically unique to a particular person.   While convenient, and seemingly secure, such biometric identification methods raise serious privacy concerns.  The Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, 740 ILCS 14, et seq. (“BIPA”), imposes many requirements concerning the collection, use, storage, and destruction of biometric information with which businesses, including employers, must comply, or risk liability.

Under BIPA, before an Illinois business collects, stores, or uses biometric identifiers, it must develop a written policy and make the policy available to the public.  The policy must include a retention schedule describing how long such data will be stored, and provide guidelines for its destruction when the reason for the original collection of the data no longer exists, such as when an employee resigns.  Additionally, Illinois businesses must describe and adhere to a destruction schedule for biometric information that it is no longer using.  If no schedule is provided, then BIPA requires that a business destroy such information within three years of the individual’s last interaction with the business.

In addition to the required written policy, Illinois businesses must obtain consent and a written release from an individual prior to collecting biometric information.  BIPA is currently one of the strictest state statutes regarding the collection, retention, storage and use of biometric information.  Before biometric information may be collected, all Illinois private entities must (1) inform the individual in writing that a biometric identifier is being collected or stored, (2) inform the individual in writing of the specific purpose and length of time for which the biometric identifier is being collected, stored and used, and (3) receive a written release executed by the individual assenting to the collection, storage and use of a biometric identifier.  Absent a court order or law enforcement directive, businesses may not share biometric information without express consent from the individual.

Illinois businesses that utilize biometric identifiers but do not comply with BIPA may face severe consequences. BIPA provides that individuals may bring an action against a business that negligently or intentionally violates a provision of BIPA.  If the claim is for negligence, the business may be liable for damages up to $1,000 per violation, and if the claim is for an intentional violation of BIPA, the business may be liable for damages up to $5,000 per violation.  Damages in either category may be higher if actual damages exceed these numbers.  An aggrieved party may also receive attorneys’ fees and costs, an injunction, and other relief.

Recently, privacy-related claims are on the rise as a result of BIPA.  Since mid-2017, over 25 lawsuits have been filed in Illinois alleging violations of BIPA.  The majority of the cases are class action lawsuits by employees claiming violations of BIPA relating to employee time clock technology that uses an employee’s fingerprint as a means of identification.  Time will only tell whether employers will spend the additional resources necessary to comply with BIPA, or choose to avoid the use of biometric identifiers and information altogether.

For more information regarding BIPA compliance and other privacy issues, please contact:

Natalie A. Remien at:

(312) 368-0100 or nremien@lgattorneys.com.

Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act

The Illinois Employee Sick Leave Act was signed by Governor Rauner on August 19, 2016, and will take effect on January 1, 2017.  Though misleadingly titled “Employee Sick Leave Act,” the Act does not require employers to provide sick leave benefits to their employees. Rather, the law requires employers who provide sick leave benefits to their employees to allow their employees to take such leave for absences due to the illness, injury, or medical appointment of the employee’s child, spouse, sibling, parent, mother-in-law, father-in-law, grandchild, grandparent, or stepparent. The leave must be granted on the same terms under which the employee is able to use sick leave benefits for his or her own illness or injury.  The term “personal sick leave benefits” is defined in the Act to include time accrued and available for absences due to personal illness, injury, or medical appointments.

The Employee Sick Leave Act does not require employers to adopt or even to retain sick leave policies. While the new law allows Illinois employers to limit the amount of personal sick leave benefits available for the care of family members to “not less than the personal sick leave that would be accrued during 6 months” at the employee’s personal sick leave accrual rate, the law specifically provides that it does not expand the maximum period of leave to which an employee is entitled under the Family and Medical Leave Act, which generally applies to employers with at least 50 employees.

Illinois employers that have policies that otherwise provide for sick leave as required by the Act do not have to modify their policies to expressly provide sick leave for family care.  The Act also makes it unlawful for employers to discharge, threaten to discharge, demote, suspend, or discriminate against employees for using sick leave benefits, attempting to exercise their rights to use sick leave benefits, filing a complaint with the Illinois Department of Labor, alleging a violation of the Act, cooperating in an investigation or prosecution of the Act, or opposing any policy, practice or act that is prohibited by the Act.

If you would like to discuss this or any employment related matter, please contact:

Mitchell S. Chaban at:

mchaban@lgattorneys.com or 312-368-0100.

REMINDER: New Illinois Law Limits an Employer’s Ability to Inquire Into Job Applicant’s Criminal History

The Illinois “Job Opportunities For Qualified Applicants Act”, which took effect on January 1, 2015, prohibits employers from inquiring about or into, considering, or requiring disclosure of the criminal record or criminal history of an applicant on a job application. In passing the Act, the Illinois legislature found that “it is in the public interest to do more to give Illinois employers access to the broadest pool of qualified applicants possible, protect the civil rights of those seeking employment, and ensure that all qualified applicants are properly considered for employment opportunities and are not pre-screened or denied an employment opportunity unnecessarily or unjustly.” The Act applies to all employers with 15 or more employees. The Act specifically excludes three types of employers: (i) employers required by federal or state law to exclude applicants with certain criminal convictions; (ii) employers that require a standard fidelity or equivalent bond where one or more specific criminal convictions would disqualify the applicant; and (iii) employers that employ individuals licensed under the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems Act. An employer may inquire into an applicant’s criminal background only after an applicant has been deemed qualified for the position and notified that he has been selected for an interview, or, if there is not an interview, only after a conditional offer of employment is made to the applicant. Employers that violate the Act are subject to civil penalties imposed by the Illinois Department of Labor. The Act does not, however, create a private cause of action for aggrieved job applicants.

To discuss any questions you may have about the effect of the Job Opportunities for Qualified Applicant Act on your business or how you can revise your employment policies to comply with the Act, please contact:

Kristen E. O’Neill at:

(312) 368-0100 or koneill@lgattorneys.com.

Alert to Property Owners: What the Firearm Concealed Carry Act Means to You.

The Firearm Concealed Carry Act became effective on July 9, 2013, and applications for concealed carry licenses became available to Illinois residents in early 2014.

What does this mean for property owners? Generally, an owner of private property may prohibit the carrying of concealed firearms on the property under his or her control, but must do so in compliance with the Firearm Concealed Carry Act.

However, the Firearm Concealed Carry Act allows holders of concealed carry licenses to keep a firearm, subject to certain requirements, in their vehicle, even if their vehicle is located in a parking area of a prohibited location.

To determine whether you are in compliance with the Firearm Concealed Carry Act’s procedures and requirements, or to review your employee handbooks and policies generally, please contact:

Mitchell S. Chaban at:

(312) 368-0100 / mchaban@lgattorneys.com

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