Tag: Regulation

You Can Run But You Can’t Hide… More On Privacy Regulation, GDPR And California. Who’s Next?

On May 25, 2018, the European General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) went into effect.  US-based companies that had offices in the European Union or European Economic Area (collectively, “EU”) or those companies whose target market consisted of persons living in the EU were forced to take both IT and legal measures to ensure compliance, or face heavy fines or potential court damages.  However, many US-based companies simply decided that they would disable their e-commerce websites to the EU, and discontinue selling products to the EU, as a means of avoiding compliance with the GDPR.

While this strategy of avoidance may be successful for certain companies to avoid taking compliance measures required by GDPR, it will not be successful as a long term strategy as more States (and potentially the federal government) adopt privacy laws similar to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”).

Passed in June, 2018, the CCPA will become effective January 1, 2020.  Once effective, US companies will have additional regulations with which to comply regarding the processing of personal information (“PI”) of California residents.  PI is defined broadly to include “any information that …relates to … a particular consumer or household”.   The law was designed to provide California consumers with a means of controlling their personal information, putting them in a better position to protect their privacy and autonomy.   Specifically, the CCPA:

  • Gives California consumers the right to know what PI a business has collected about them or their children;
  • Gives California consumers the right to know if such PI has been sold or disclosed for a business purpose, and if so, to whom;
  • Gives California consumers a right to have their PI deleted;
  • Requires businesses to disclose to California consumers if it sells any of the consumer’s PI has been sold, and if so, allows California consumers to request that the business cease any sales of the consumer’s PI;
  • Prevents a business from denying, changing, or charging more for a service if a California consumer requests information about the sale of the consumer’s PI, or refuses to allow the business to sell the consumer’s PI; and
  • Requires businesses to safeguard California consumers’ PI and hold them accountable if such PI is compromised as a result of a security breach arising from the business’s failure to take reasonable steps to protect the security of consumers’ sensitive information.

Who Must Comply?     Companies must comply if, in the course of their business, they receive PI from any California residents and if they or their parent or subsidiary either: (1) generate annual gross revenues in excess of $25 million, (2) collect PI of 50,000 or more California residents, households or devices annually, or (3) generate 50% or more of its annual revenue from selling California residents’ PI.  Interestingly, parent companies and subsidiaries using the same branding are covered by the definition of “business” even if they themselves do not meet or exceed these parameters.  Thus, essentially, most all US companies whose websites collect PI (even though obtaining IP addresses) are subject to the CCPA, unless they can ensure that less than 50,000 California residents or less than 50,000 of their devices visit the company’s site annually.

What about Companies Who Do Not Do Business in California?

Many US companies may have difficulty showing that they do not do business in California.  According to the California Civil Code, only companies whose “commercial conduct takes place wholly outside of California” would be able to avoid the CCPA.  Further, a company outside California is deemed to be “doing business” in California if it actively engages in any transaction for the purpose of financial or pecuniary gain or profit in California”.  Those companies outside California but that are qualified to do business in California may be subject to the CCPA if they enter into “repeated and successive transactions” in California, including online transactions.  However, while this is only limited to California, it is very probably that other states will adopt similar legislation.

Whose Information Is Affected?

The new law defines “consumer” broadly to include not only customers, but also employees, patients, tenants, students, parents and children.  (Cal. Civ. Code Sec. 1798.140(g).  A “resident” includes natural persons who are in California for anything other than a temporary or transitory purpose, and, those natural persons who are domiciled in California who are out of the State for a temporary or transitory purpose.

What Are The Penalties of Non-Compliance?

If a business is not incompliance with CCPA, the California Attorney General’s Office may bring a civil action against the business.   The Office may levy penalties for non-compliance of up to $7500 per intentional violation of any provision or $2500 per violation for unintentional violations that are not cured within 30 days of notification.

What are Companies To Do?

Moving forward, all US Companies must engage in data mapping to determine what PI it collects, and then put in place updated privacy notices, and other procedures to comply with all relevant regulations.  While California is often the ringleader, certainly other states are also developing similar laws aimed at the protecting PI of its residents.  Until such time as a federal privacy regulation is put into place, US companies will need to analyze carefully where they do business and comply with a patchwork of state laws.

To learn more about the CCPA and other privacy related matters, please contact the author:

Natalie A. Remien, CIPP/US at:

nremien@lgattorneys.com or (312) 368-0100.

Industrial Growth Zones Created

The City of Chicago and Cook County recently announced the creation of an “Industrial Growth Zone” initiative in order to encourage industrial development in seven designated Chicagoland neighborhoods.  These neighborhoods are principally located in existing industrial areas on the south and west sides of the City.  The program is intended to incentivize industrial development in these neighborhoods by removing barriers to further development and by providing services to support property owners and industrial developers in their development efforts.  Specifically, the services to be provided are aimed at two primary impediments to development: evaluation and remediation of environmental conditions and maneuvering complex governmental regulations.

Much of the land located within the Industrial Growth Zone program has been previously developed and used for industrial purposes.  Accordingly, to redevelop these properties, a developer will first need to conduct a Phase I environmental site assessment and, depending on the identification of recognized environmental conditions, to perform some level of environmental remediation.  This can constitute a significant barrier to development as the cost to conduct the required testing and the possible costs associated with remediating hazardous environmental conditions may be substantial both in terms of costs and delays in commencing construction.  The Industrial Growth Zone initiative will provide qualified developers up to $130,000 of financial assistance for environmental evaluation and remediation efforts.  Specifically, developers may be eligible for $5,000 to update an existing Phase I environmental report and up to $25,000 to conduct a Phase II report.  Additional funds in the amount of $100,000 may be available to remediate environmental conditions.

Additionally, the initiative will establish a “concierge” program.  The concierge will serve as a single point of contact for providing assistance to developers in conducting site evaluation and working their way through voluminous and complex layers of governmental regulations and requirements.  The concierge will assist in making available a broad range of site data and documentation required in connection with the development of properties.  This data includes, among other things, zoning maps, aerial photos, surveys, ownership and real estate tax history, analysis of utility availability, flood plain classification, and providing information regarding the presence of wetlands and endangered species.  Having access to this information at the early stages of the development process will save a developer time and effort in conducting its due diligence, evaluating the suitability of a property for development, and commencing the process of obtaining required governmental approvals.

For further information regarding Industrial Growth Zones, real estate development and related issues, please contact:

Jeffrey M. Galkin at:

jgalkin@lgattorneys.com or 312-368-0100.

Is It a Hobby or a Business and What Does the IRS Think?

A taxpayer may deduct “all the ordinary and necessary expenses paid or incurred during the taxable year in carrying on any trade or business.” But if the activity giving rise to the expenses “is not engaged in for profit,” these activities are not considered a “trade or business” and are commonly referred to as “hobbies”. Hobby expenses may only be deducted from hobby profits and not from any other income that the taxpayer may have.

In 2014 the Tax Court held that a taxpayer had deducted the expenses of his horse-racing enterprise on his federal income tax returns for 2005 and 2006 erroneously because the enterprise was a hobby rather than a business. The court assessed tax deficiencies.  But it also ruled that the business had ceased to be a hobby, and had become a bona fide business, in 2007. He challenged the assessments for 2005 and 2006.

The Tax Court’s ruling that the horse-racing enterprise was a hobby in 2005 and 2006 but became a business in 2007 and remained so in 2008, and every year thereafter (the IRS failed to challenge any deductions for any year after 2008) was held by the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals to be “untenable; it amounts to saying that a business’s start-up costs are not deductible business expenses-that every business starts as a hobby and becomes a business only when it achieves a certain level of profitability.”

The Seventh Circuit then cited what it felt to be a “goofy regulation” (Treas.Reg. § 1.183-2) and addressed the various factors used to determine whether an activity is engaged in for profit:

(1)  Manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
(2)  The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
(3)  The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
(4)  Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
(5)  The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
(6)  The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
(7)  The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
(8)  The financial status of the taxpayer.
(9)  Elements of personal pleasure or recreation.

The Court went on to note, “a business will not be turned into a hobby merely because the owner finds it pleasurable; suffering has never been made a prerequisite to deductibility. Success in business is largely obtained by pleasurable interest therein.”

This case recognizes that every start-up business is not a hobby just because there is no profit at the beginning. Here that Tax Court seemed to take the position that the taxpayer started in the horse racing business as a hobby and then turned it into a business. The Appellate Court rejected this and held for the taxpayer.

If you have any questions regarding start-up businesses, please contact:

Morris R. Saunders at:

(312) 368-0100 or msaunders@lgattorneys.com

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