Important Change to the Illinois Equal Pay Act

California Fair Pay Act vs Equal Pay Act, What's the Difference?

An amendment to the Illinois Equal Pay Act (“Illinois EPA”) that took effect January 1, 2022 clarified that the Illinois EPA does not prohibit employers from discussing with job applicants the unvested equity or deferred compensation that the applicant would forfeit upon resigning from the applicant’s current employer.

While the Illinois EPA continues to restrict employers’ ability to ask applicants questions about their compensation, the amendment clarifies that employers may discuss unvested equity and deferred compensation, only if an applicant for employment voluntarily discloses that the applicant would forfeit unvested equity and/or deferred compensation by resigning from their current employer. If an applicant voluntarily discloses that they will forfeit unvested equity or deferred compensation, employers may request that the applicant verify the aggregate amount of such compensation.

Employers and employment recruiters should be cognizant of this important change to the Illinois EPA, particularly given the current labor market. Further, employers and employment recruiters should be careful to not violate the Illinois EPA if the applicant does not voluntarily disclose compensation from his or her prior employer.

Having an experienced employment attorney evaluate your employment issues is critical to avoiding problems resulting from failing to comply with state and federal law. For more information regarding these or similar issues, please contact Mitchell S. Chaban at mchaban@lgattorneys.com or (312) 368-0100.

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An Employer Can Be Liable for Accessing an Employee’s Personal Email Even if the Employee Engaged in Misconduct

Over the last several years, communication via email and text has become commonplace in the workplace. Oftentimes, employees use one device for both personal and work-related communication regardless of whether that device is employee-owned or employer-provided. There is no doubt that employers may have legitimate business reasons for monitoring employee communications. For example, an employee may leave the company and the employer is concerned that she has taken confidential information or illegally solicited clients. Employers feel entitled to review data stored on employer-provided, particularly where employees are instructed that the company owns the devices and has the right to monitor the data.  As a general rule, the law supports employers here.  An employer’s zeal to snoop, however, may subject it to both civil and criminal penalties under both federal and state statutes.

The Electronic Communication Privacy Act (ECPA) and the Stored Communications Act (SCA) both govern an employer’s ability to review electronic communications. The ECPA prohibits the interception of electronic communications, and the term “interception” as used in the ECPA has been interpreted narrowly. The SCA makes it illegal to “access without authorization a facility through which electronic communication service is provided,” making it illegal to obtain access to certain communications in electronic storage. With regard to an employer’s review of employee emails sent through web-based email accounts like Gmail or Hotmail, the most frequent scenario is where the former employer is able to access the former employee’s web-based email account because the employee saved his username and password on a device provided by the employer. In these cases, courts have typically sided with the former employee and have been reluctant to punish the former employee for failing to take appropriate steps to secure their own personal information and allegedly private communications.  The former employee’s own negligence in securing personal data is not a defense for the employer.

Bottom line – an employer should seek advice before accessing an employee’s personal email account without authorization even though it has the ability to do so.

For more information on this topic please contact:

Howard Teplinsky at:

312-368-0100 or hteplinsky@lgattorneys.com.

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